Featured Color Story: Whites in Oil Colors

White, color or no color, the color of purity, the divine and life itself. The oil colors range of Royal Talens has many different whites. In order to be able to make the right choice, the different properties and applications of these whites are described below.

BINDERS

Pigments determine the color of the paint, the lightfastness and the opacity or transparency. All other properties of a paint are determined by the binder. Royal Talens whites are made with two different binders: linseed oil and safflower oil.

LINSEED OIL

Safflower Oil, Linseed Oil

For more than five hundred years linseed oil has been the most important binder for oil paint. Linseed oil is pressed from the seed of the flax plant. Linseed as binder for oil paint has proven to have the best properties. Other drying oils give a less durable layer of paint, can darken considerably or take far too long to dry. There is unfortunately no oil that is optimal for every desired property; however, linseed oil has proven throughout the centuries to have the best combination of properties. As linseed oil shows some yellowing in time, some artists prefer to replace it with safflower oil, particularly for white paint.

SAFFLOWER OIL

Safflower Thistle

Safflower oil is pressed from the seed of the safflower thistle. This oil turns less yellow than linseed oil, but also has some disadvantages; the drying time is longer and the oil forms a film with other properties than those of linseed oil. As a result of these other properties, the use of white paint based on safflower oil in a painting that is built up of various layers (whereby it forms the undercoat for colours based on linseed oil) can cause the subsequent layers to crack or even to be unable to adhere properly. It is therefore advisable to limit the use of white paint based on safflower oil until the final phase of the painting.

 

TL;DR

Linseed oil shows some yellowing in time, so it is sometimes replaced by safflower oil- particularly for white paint. Although safflower oil yellows less, it also has a disadvantage- it dries more slowly. Safflower oil is therefore not suitable for pasty use and lower paint layers.

 

Dekkend= Opaque

Half Dekkend= Semi-opaque

Transparant= Transparent

 

TITANIUM WHITE (105, 118)
COVERING POWER: OPAQUE | HUE: WARM | PIGMENTS: PW6/PW4
Titanium white is an opaque, warm (yellowish) white. Available on the basis of safflower oil (105) for top layer and linseed oil (118) in lower layers. Titanium white is recommended if opaque mixed colors are required.

ZINC WHITE (104, 117)
COVERING POWER: SEMI-OPAQUE | HUE: COOL | PIGMENTS: PW4
Zinc white is a semi-opaque, cool (bluish) white. Available on the basis of safflower oil (104) for top layer and linseed oil (117) in lower layers. Zinc white is often recommended as the best white to use to make colours lighter. Due to its lower covering power, zinc white makes colours lighter without weakening the intensity of the colour.

MIXED WHITE (103)
COVERING POWER: OPAQUE | HUE: NEUTRAL | PIGMENTS: PW6/PW4
Mixed white is a neutral white based on safflower oil. Mixed white contains zinc white and titanium white pigments combined in an ideal ratio.

TRANSPARENT WHITE (119)
COVERING POWER: TRANSPARENT | HUE: COOL | PIGMENTS: PW6/PW4
Transparent white is a transparent, cool (bluish) white based on safflower oil. Ideally suited for making a white glazing and mixtures with transparent colours.

PEARL WHITE (817)
COVERING POWER: TRANSPARENT | HUE: WARM | PIGMENTS: PW6
Pear white is a transparent white with mother of peral effect based on safflower oil. The mother of pearl effect is best seen on darker grounds. To add colour to the mother of pearl and to retain the effect, add only a small amount of transparent colour.

There are no comments published yet.

Leave a Comment